August172014
ghastliel:

perspicious:


WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


                                                                             


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


CREDIT [X]  [X]

I deal with these on a nearly weekly basis. Sometimes more frequently, it ebbs and flows. The most important thing I have to stress about this is DO NOT leave the person panicking alone! Someone left me alone the last time I had an attack, even as I was reaching for them and trying to mutter the words “please stay”. I wound up choking on my own saliva and I would have been in serious trouble if another person hadn’t walked around the corner and gotten help for me. Also, I don’t think this is as well known, but panicking people are very prone to fainting spells. Some attacks can wax and wane for hours, so chances are, we’re not getting enough air. If we try to stand or move, we’re done for. Don’t try to move a panicking person if they’ve been at it for a while, because they could very well collapse (I’ve taken some painful tumbles, myself).
Like the OP mentions, this is a medical emergency. It may go away on it’s own, or the person may end up having complications and being in serious danger. Do not walk away just because of what it looks like, or based on preconceived notions of what a panic attack is.

ghastliel:

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                             
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.

CREDIT [X]  [X]

I deal with these on a nearly weekly basis. Sometimes more frequently, it ebbs and flows. The most important thing I have to stress about this is DO NOT leave the person panicking alone! Someone left me alone the last time I had an attack, even as I was reaching for them and trying to mutter the words “please stay”. I wound up choking on my own saliva and I would have been in serious trouble if another person hadn’t walked around the corner and gotten help for me. Also, I don’t think this is as well known, but panicking people are very prone to fainting spells. Some attacks can wax and wane for hours, so chances are, we’re not getting enough air. If we try to stand or move, we’re done for. Don’t try to move a panicking person if they’ve been at it for a while, because they could very well collapse (I’ve taken some painful tumbles, myself).

Like the OP mentions, this is a medical emergency. It may go away on it’s own, or the person may end up having complications and being in serious danger. Do not walk away just because of what it looks like, or based on preconceived notions of what a panic attack is.

(via striped-tomato)

1AM
August162014

"Dad was, is and always will be one of the kindest, most generous, gentlest souls I’ve ever known, and while there are few things I know for certain right now, one of them is that not just my world, but the entire world is forever a little darker, less colorful and less full of laughter in his absence. We’ll just have to work twice as hard to fill it back up again." - Zelda Williams

(Source: theroning, via carrie-stewbert)

August142014
the-dude-sisco:

If there is one picture i post on here that i really wish y’all would reblog the fuck out of, it’s this one.
PLEASE. It could save many people that are under the ridiculous police state going on right now in Ferguson Missouri. Those people need our help.

the-dude-sisco:

If there is one picture i post on here that i really wish y’all would reblog the fuck out of, it’s this one.

PLEASE. It could save many people that are under the ridiculous police state going on right now in Ferguson Missouri. Those people need our help.

(via raggedy-spaceman)

10PM

kohenari:

The photos and information coming out of Ferguson, MO this evening are shocking.

SWAT teams clearing out fast food restaurants, journalists arrested, full-scale police-as-military response to non-violent protest.

And yet perhaps the most amazing thing is that there seem not to be any elected officials willing to tell this police force to stand down.

(via raggedy-spaceman)

10PM

chicagotribune:

After tear gas in Ferguson, Anonymous claims to name officer

Authorities in Missouri on Thursday stood by their earlier decision to withhold the name of the police officer who fatally shot an unarmed black teenager, but denied he was the person identified online by Anonymous.

Right now, our gallery contains 61 photos and we’re adding to it as often as we can. Click here to see them all.

(via raggedy-spaceman)

10PM
illumahottie:

illumahottie:

I have tears in my eyes.

Like I don’t even think you guys understand the magnitude of this tweet. The sheer humanity of this, they are dying over there. No they are being SLAUGHTERED but they have the ability to still think to help people they have never met, people they will never meet. They understand what the people in Ferguson are going through, they see it because they are going through it too.

illumahottie:

illumahottie:

I have tears in my eyes.

Like I don’t even think you guys understand the magnitude of this tweet. The sheer humanity of this, they are dying over there. No they are being SLAUGHTERED but they have the ability to still think to help people they have never met, people they will never meet. They understand what the people in Ferguson are going through, they see it because they are going through it too.

(Source: andikilledelevenofthem, via raggedy-spaceman)

10PM

tankdock:

Everyone needs to look at how quickly police turned against these citizens and how much power we’ve given to these men and women, and then I want you to think about the day they turn on you and I hope no one helps if you think you’re above what’s happening right now.

(via raggedy-spaceman)

10PM
Jimmy Fallon pays tribute to Robin Williams on The Tonight Show

(Source: barkingsparrows, via carrie-stewbert)

10PM
“This isn’t freedom. We’re holding a gun to every citizen’s head and calling it security.” Captain America (we could really use a guy like him right about now)

(Source: dsneylou, via raggedy-spaceman)

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